One dead, four injured in road accident [ 15m ago ]

FEATURES News List

Humanity Backbone of Volunteer's Success

By Tengku Faezah Tengku Yusof

KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama) -- She is a successful career woman, wife, mother and active volunteer all rolled into one.

Even as a five-year-old growing up in Ghent, Belgium, Datin Raja Riza Shazmin Raja Badrul Shah – who has participated in humanitarian missions overseas – was quite unlike other children her age.

Instead of playing and having fun all day long, she preferred to spend her time going from house to house selling apples to raise funds for charity.

Can Yoga Be the New 'Insulin' to Control Diabetes?

By V. Sankara Subramaniam

(This article is released in conjunction with World Diabetes Day which falls on Nov 14)

KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama) -- A fitness regime is something doctors would recommend for diabetes patients. Dr H. R. Nagendra, who is Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's yoga consultant, strongly believes that the ancient Indian practice is an effective treatment for the prevention and management of the disease.  

The 77-year-old yoga exponent, who is from Bengaluru in the South Indian state of Karnataka, said people in countries like India, China and Malaysia were genetically prone to type 2 diabetes mellitus and hence, the necessity for them to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

He said leading experts from notable yoga associations in India have studied how yoga can control the symptoms and complications associated with type 2 diabetes.

Haven For Wildlife, Nature Lovers

By Rohana Nasrah

The recent discovery of three Borneo pygmy elephant carcasses in the space of five weeks in Sabah has raised concern over the conservation of this endangered species, found only in this part of the world. This final of a five-part series covers the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary which is home to Sabah’s unique wildlife.

KOTA KINABALU (Bernama) -- It was a sight to behold and worth the three-hour wait. An up-close view of the famed Borneo pygmy elephants of Sabah browsing on assorted vegetation in their natural habitat is a rare opportunity for most people.

This writer got what she wanted when she recently set out for Kampung Bilit, about 375 kilometres from here, in Kinabatangan district. From the jetty at Kampung Bilit, she and her photographer colleague took a 30-minute boat ride to the lower banks of Sungai Kinabatangan, which is part of the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary. They were not the only people there. About 13 other boats were there too, each with six to eight tourists who were equally eager to see these unique jumbos that are relatively smaller in size and more sociable than the typical Asian species.

The atmosphere livened up when the “stars” appeared. Not one or two but 16 of them, including two calves. They grazed on the grass and ambled over to the river to quench their thirst, unperturbed by all that attention they were getting. Occasionally, the sound of an elephant trumpeting rang out and it almost seemed like they were greeting the humans who were obviously enchanted by them.

E-cigarettes a burning issue

By Erda Khursyiah Basir

SEOUL (Bernama) -- The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) or vaping has become an issue and has triggered polemics around the world, including in Malaysia.

One reason for this may be the report by United States authorities about 33 deaths and 1,479 confirmed and probable cases from a ‘mysterious’ respiratory illness linked to vaping. 

There is global concern that the use of e-cigarettes or vaping among youths, especially school children, can cause a decline in the morals of the younger generation and create more social problems.

Putting An End To Man-Elephant Conflicts In Sabah

By Rohana Nasrah

The recent discovery of three Borneo pygmy elephant carcasses in the space of five weeks in Sabah has raised concern over the conservation of this endangered species, found only in this part of the world. This fourth of a five-part series focuses on the Sabah government’s initiatives to overcome the ongoing man-elephant conflict and enhance conservation efforts.

KOTA KINABALU (Bernama) -- When forests make way for agricultural activities and human settlements are built close to wildlife habitats, where would the animals go in search of food? No prizes for guessing the answer.

In Sabah, which is known for its Borneo pygmy elephant population, conflicts between humans and elephants have existed since 1960 when oil palm plantations started creeping into forested areas.

The confrontations between man and beast were under control then as elephant habitats were generally still intact.

Fikirlah: Lingering Memories Of Uzbekistan

By Sakini Mohd Said

SAMARKAND (Bernama) -- As soon as our Uzbekistan Airways Flight HY554 touched on the runway at Tashkent International Airport after an eight-hour flight from Kuala Lumpur, thunderous applause echoed in the cabin and a lively local song came on-air.

Apparently, Uzbek air passengers have this habit of clapping their hands when the plane they are travelling in makes a smooth landing.

I was travelling to the central Asian country to cover the 12th Sharq Taronalari  International Music Festival at Registan Square in Samarkand in August.

Villagers Near Elephant Habitats Seek Win-Win Solution

By Rohana Nasrah

The recent discovery of three Borneo pygmy elephant carcasses in the space of five weeks in Sabah has raised concern over the conservation of this endangered species, found only in this part of the world. This third of a five-part series looks at the menace posed by wild elephants that encroach on land belonging to villagers.

KOTA KINABALU (Bernama) -- The villagers of Kampung Sukau and Kampung Menanggol in Kinabatangan, located about 380 kilometres from here, are almost at their wits end trying to stop wild elephants from encroaching on their farms and oil palm smallholdings and destroying their crops.

But keeping these jumbos away is no mean task and often the villagers have to dice with danger should they have the misfortune of coming face to face with one of these mighty creatures.

Sabah is well-known for its Borneo pygmy elephant population and the siting of human settlements close to their habitats is always an open invitation for human-elephant conflicts. And, Kampung Sukau and the nearby Kampung Menanggol are no different. Inhabited by more than 2,200 people who are mostly farmers and smallholders, the two villages face elephant intrusions practically every week.  

Their crops get eaten up by the elephants which by the time they are done with the foraging leave a trail of destruction behind them.