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Community An Important Facet Of Geopark Development

By Noorazlina Jindeh

The proposed Kinabalu Geopark is now undergoing the necessary evaluation prior to its recognition as a national geopark. This final of a two-part article zooms in on a few geosites in Kota Belud and Kota Marudu.

 

KOTA BELUD (Bernama) -- Kampung Kiau Nuluh, a picturesque village in the foothills of the majestic Mount Kinabalu, is a perfect fit for a geopark site. 

Surrounded by lush rainforests and rolling hills, the village is located 600 to 1,400 metres above sea level.

Having existed for almost a century, it is rich in history and culture -- hence, it is little wonder that this village is among the 30 geosites with geological, biological and cultural heritage values that are set to be part of the proposed Kinabalu Geopark.

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Idle Land Development Yields Success Stories

By Kurniawati Kamarudin

The vast tracts of agricultural land abandoned by their owners due to old age or other reasons are a matter of concern. If put to good use, its output can help the nation to slash its yearly food import bill that now runs into billions of ringgit.

This final of a four-part series of articles tracks the experiences of two people who have successfully rehabilitated their idle land.

 

TEMERLOH (Bernama) -- Shahrizal Salleh's two-hectare plot of land in Kampung Paya Jejawi here, that has been lying idle for five years, is now thriving with 250 young coconut and 2,000 banana trees planted there.

Cultivated a year ago, the 'berangan' bananas will be ripe for harvesting by September while it will take another three to four years before the yellow Malayan coconuts can be harvested.

Previously overrun by unsightly weed, bushes and undergrowth, the plot's transformation was made possible through the Department of Agriculture's (DoA) Idle Land Development programme, an initiative it introduced in 2007 to encourage landowners to utilise land that has been left unused for agricultural purposes.

 

DoA Lends A Helping Hand To Develop Idle Land

By Kurniawati Kamarudin

The vast tracts of agricultural land abandoned by their owners due to old age or other reasons are a matter of concern. If put to good use, its output can help the nation to slash its yearly food import bill that now runs into billions of ringgit. This third of a four-part series of articles looks at the Department of Agriculture's initiatives to develop idle land.

 

KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama) --  The development of abandoned agricultural land first came on the radar of the Department of Agriculture (DoA) when the Eighth Malaysia Plan (2001-2005) was implemented.

However, it was only in 2007 that the department introduced the Idle Land Development Programme to encourage owners of unused land to cultivate their plots or lease it out to others.

The programme was aimed at optimising the nation's valuable land resources and preventing them from going to waste in order to increase food production capacities and reduce the nation's dependence on food imports.

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